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Penn Center For East Asian Studies Newsletter

2010 - 11: Issue no. 3, September 24, 2010
The CEAS Newsletter weekly notifies East Asianists in our region of events and opportunities of interest. Notices appear under six headings:
  1. University of Pennsylvania East Asia Events
  2. Regional East Asia Events
  3. Employment and Internship Opportunities
  4. Fellowship and Award Opportunities
  5. East Asia Study Opportunities and Queries
  6. Conferences and Workshops

If you have notices in these categories that you would like posted here, please send them to nriley@sas.upenn.edu.

* Indicates notices appearing here for the first time.

To get the latest information and updates, please follow us on Twitter (@PennCEAS) or visit our Events page.


Featured Event

Thursday, October 7, 4:30PM, Williams Hall 205,
I Did It My Way: Perspectives on East Asian History

G. Cameron Hurst III, Professor Emeritus, University of Pennsylvania

Humanities Colloquium



(I) University of Pennsylvania East Asia Events

Tuesday, September 28, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Gidrah the Three-Headed Monster
Honda Ishiro 1964

__________

2010 Fall Forum for International Internships
Presented by The Office of International Programs

Friday, October 1st, 2010
1:00pm—5:00pm
Class of 1955 Conference Room
Van Pelt Library
Reception after the forum

Students who conducted internships abroad over the summer share their research, findings and experiences in a panel format

Panelists will present on topics including:
Public Health
Health Policy
Clinical Research
Education
Engineering
Sanitation
Development
NGO and Non-Profit Administration

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Tuesday, October 5, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Godzilla vs The Smog Monster
Banno Yoshimitsu 1971

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Penn Museum: Great Adventures along the Silk Road Series

Great Sites on the Silk Road

Penn Museum's 2010-2011 monthly  lecture/reception series will explore all the adventures the Silk Road has to offer, from mummies to Marco Polo to military warfare to the Black Death. In this first program,

"Great Sites on the Silk Road," Dr. Nancy Steinhardt, Professor of East Asian Art and the Museum's Curator of Chinese Art,

will introduce the Silk Road in relation to the exhibition Secrets of the Silk Road opening February 5, showing some routes, early travelers, major sites, key monuments, and some most extraordinary discoveries. Wine and cheese reception in the Chinese Rotunda to follow.

Admission: $40 series subscription (nine events); $5 per lecture with advance registration; FREE for Penn Museum members with advance registration; $10 at the door.

___________

Thursday, October 7, 4:30PM, Williams Hall 205,
I Did It My Way: Perspectives on East Asian History

G. Cameron Hurst III, Professor Emeritus, University of Pennsylvania

Humanities Colloquium

__________

Family Sundays: Buddhist Devotional Dioramas

Oct 10, 1-4PM
Penn Museum - Philadelphia

Be inspired by Penn Museum's collection of Buddhist artifacts. Touch
a mini-Buddhist altar from Japan and learn about the objects within it. Then, create your own Buddhist devotional diorama.
Admission: Free with Penn
Museum admission donation.

__________

Tuesday, October 12, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Godzilla 1985
Hashimoto Koji 1984

__________

Wednesday, October 13, 4:30PM, Stiteler B26, Title TBA

Michael Szonyi, Harvard

Humanities Colloquium

__________

Thursday, October 14, 3:30PM, Amado Recital Hall, Irvine Auditorium (3401 Spruce)

Son Preference in Asia : Causes & Consequences

Monica Das Gupta, World Bank

A reception will follow at the adjoining Cafe 58

Co-Sponsored by: Center for East Asian Studies, Center for the Advanced Study of India , Population Studies Center and the Evelyn Jacobs Ortner Center

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Thursday, October 14, 4:30PM, Annenberg 111

Revolutionaries, Nursery Rhymes, and Edison Wax Cylinders: The Remarkable Tale of the Earliest Sound Recordings of Korean Music

Robert C. Provine
University of Maryland , School of Music

On July 24, 1896, three young Korean men in Washington DC were recorded on Edison wax cylinders by American ethnologist Alice Cunningham Fletcher, as they sang traditional songs from their home country. There were only a few Koreans in the U.S. capital at the time, most of them associated with the Korean Legation, representing the largely unknown country of Choson. These musical performances are part of the fascinating story of early Korea-US relations in the turbulent late nineteenth century. This lecture, illustrated with images and audio excerpts, explores the historical circumstances and musical significance of these early recordings, and it touches on a remarkable and interesting cast of characters, both Korean and American. Among them are a group of Korean musicians sent to the World Columbian Exposition of 1893 in Chicago, collections of Korean musical instruments at U.S. museums, Korean revolutionaries from the unsuccessful coup d'état of 1884 who fled to the United States, a pioneer of American ethnomusicology, and the first Korean graduate of an American college.

Korean Studies Colloquium

__________

National Committee on U.S.-China Relations presents

CHINA Town Hall:  Local Connections, National Reflections

Monday, October 18, 8PM
University of Pennsylvania Law School

CHINA Town Hall is a national day of programming on China involving 50 cities throughout the United States.  The National Committee is pleased to present this program, which will feature a webcast by Jon M. Huntsman, Jr., U.S. Ambassador to China, followed by local presentations from on-site China specialists addressing topics of particular interest to the community.

The University of Pennsylvania Law School will host a presentation by Dr. David M. Lampton of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, following the 8PM webcast.

More information can be found at: http://www.ncuscr.org/programs/cth

__________

Tuesday, October 19, 4:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

The Last Days of Old Beijing : An Illustrated Book Talk by author Michael Meyer

A longtime Beijing resident, author Michael Meyer lived for three years as no other Westerner in a shared courtyard home in Beijing 's oldest neighborhood, Dazhalan, on one of its famed hutong (lanes). There he volunteered to teach English at the local grade school and immersed himself in the community, recording with affection the life stories of the Widow, who shares his courtyard; co-teacher Miss Zhu and student Little Liu; and the migrants Recycler Wang and Soldier Liu; among the many others who, despite great differences in age and profession, make up the fabric of this unique neighborhood.

Their bond is rapidly being torn, however, by forced evictions as century-old houses and ways of life are increasingly destroyed to make way for shopping malls, the capital's first Wal-Mart, high-rise buildings, and widened streets for cars replacing bicycles. Beijing has gone through this cycle many times, as Meyer reveals, but never with the kind of dislocation and overturning of its storied culture now occurring.

Join us to see photos and hear about Meyer's first book, in addition to his current research on a rice farm in China 's far northeast.

Issues in Contemporary East Asia Lecture Series

__________

Tuesday, October 19, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Godzilla vs. Mothra
Okawara Takao 1992

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Friday, October 22, 5 to 7 PM

International Student & Scholar Reception

Chinese Rotunda • Penn Museum

3260 South Street (33rd and Spruce) Philadelphia , PA 19104

Join us for an evening of fun and networking! Open to all international students and scholars living and working in the Philadelphia area.

Dress Code: Traditional or Business

For More Information: (215) 898-4065/4066/4067 • ic@museum.upenn.edu

http://www.penn.museum

__________

Tuesday, October 26, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Nausicä of the Valley of the Winds
Miyazaki Hayao 1994

__________

Thursday, October 28, 4:30PM, Stiteler B21,
Art and Politics in North Korea

Dr. Donald N. Clark
Professor, Department of History
Trinity University

Korean Studies Colloquium

__________

Tuesday, November 2, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Gamera, Guardian of the Universe
Kaneko Shusuke 1995

__________

Wednesday, November 3, 4:30PM, Stiteler B26, Title TBA

Andrew Hare

Humanities Colloquium, Co-sponsored by the History of Art Department

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Penn Museum: Great Adventures Along the Silk Road Lecture Series

Mummies of the Tarim Basin
Nov 03 2010 06:00PM - 08:00PM

With her graceful eyelashes, flaxen hair, and serene expression, the lady known as the "Beauty of Xiaohe" seems to have just softly fallen into sleep-yet she last closed her eyes nearly 4,000 years ago. She is one of the extraordinary Tarim Basin mummies recently discovered in the harsh desert of Central Asia. Never before seen in the United States, the "Beauty," a baby mummy, and artifacts from their pre-Silk Road period graves are an exciting aspect of Secrets of the Silk Road, opening at the Penn Museum February 5, 2011.

Dr Victor H. Mair, Curatorial Consultant for "Secrets of the Silk Road," and co-author, The Tarim Mummies,

discusses the ongoing discovery of these extraordinary mummies, what we have learned-and what remains to be uncovered. Reception to follow.
Admission: $40 series subscription (nine events); $5 per lecture with advance registration; FREE for Penn Museum members with advance registration; $10 at the door.

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Educators' Evening

Thursday, November 4, 2010

4:30 – 6:30 pm

Free

Professional Development Credit Available

Penn Museum on the University of Pennsylvania campus is the only East Coast venue for Secrets of the Silk Road . This family-friendly exhibition showcases recent discoveries from the vast Tarim Basin desert in western China, where a series of rich and culturally diverse burials and spectacularly preserved mummies have been uncovered. Secrets of the Silk Road tells the fascinating story of 3,500 years of trade and cultural exchange along the world's most famous trading route. Visitors will encounter ancient jewelry, clothing, textiles, personal items, and even the remarkably preserved food of these famous mummies from Central Asia. Exhibition organized by the Bowers Museum (Santa Ana, California), in association with the Archaeological Institute of Xinjiang and the Urumqi Museum.

Join area teachers at the Penn Museum for an Educators' Evening on Thursday, November 4, from 4:30 to 6:30 pm.

•  Receive 2 Act 48 or NJ Professional Development credit hours

•  Learn the story behind the Secrets of the Silk Road exhibition as the exhibition's curatorial consultant and Penn professor Victor Mair lectures about his discoveries

•  Learn how area educators have integrated Silk Road-related topics into their curriculum

•  Discover other educational resources on Penn's campus when you meet representatives from Penn's Centers: African Studies, Middle East, East Asian, and South Asia

•  Test exhibition prototypes of interactives, shop at the Penn Museum's store, and more!

To learn more about Educators' Evening and to RSVP, contact Jennifer Reifsteck at (215) 898-4016 or jreif@upenn.edu.


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Tuesday, November 9, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Godzilla vs. Destroyah
Okawara Takao 1995

__________

Sunday, November 14, 1-5PM

Celebrate Japan !
A day of festivities commemorating the 150th Anniversary of Japan's first Mission to the US and its delegation's visit to Philadelphia .  Activities will include demonstrations, lectures, and other exhibits. 

Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

3260 South Street , Philadelphia , PA   19104

Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies, Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia , and the Penn Museum

__________

Monday, November 15, 4:30PM, Annenberg 111,
Whose Michi Is It Anyway?:
The Road(s) to Buddhahood in the Heian Court

Stephen Miller, University of Massachusetts , Amherst

Humanities Colloquium

__________

Tuesday, November 16, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

The Great Yokai War
Miike Takeshi 2005

__________ 

Monday, November 22, 4:30PM, Stiteler B26, Title TBA

Tracy Miller, Vanderbilt

Humanities Colloquium

__________

Tuesday, November 23, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Godzilla Millenium
Okawara Takao 1999

__________

Tuesday, November 30, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Godzilla, Mothra, King Ghidorah: All Monsters Attack
Kaneko Shusuke 2001

__________

Tuesday, December 7, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Godzilla: Final Wars
Kitamura Ryohei 2004

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Tuesday, December 14, 6:30PM, Cohen Hall 402

Monsters of Japan Film Series

Reading Days Bonus: The Host
Gwoemul Bong Joon-ho 2006



(II) Regional East Asia Events

The Wuhan Student Troupe Performance, Wuhan University, China

When :  October 17, 2010 at 2:00 pm

Where : Schuylkill Valley High School, 929 Lakeshore Drive Leesport, PA 19533-8631

Cost :    Free

Please join us for a performance of dance, music, and martial arts presented by the Wuhan University Student Troupe.  This event is being hosted by Schuylkill Valley High School. Tickets for this event are not required. If you have any questions please contact Susan Calvin at suecal@berksiu.org or 610-987-8639. See you there!

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Upcoming Events at Shofuso:

Otsukimi Moonviewing Party

September 25, 6pm – 9pm

Enjoy sushi and sake, sing songs, and celebrate a successful harvest while watching the moon rise over the pine trees. The beauty of Shofuso at night is not to be missed. $55 nonmembers/$45 members. Register online at http://www.shofuso.com/?page_id=15

Tea Ceremony

Experience a traditional Japanese tea ceremony led by a tea master. Learn about the history and principles of Chanoyu (tea ceremony), drink a bowl of Matcha (green tea) and taste a seasonal sweet. Tea ceremony is conducted in two seatings at 1 pm and 2:30 pm.  Space is limited and reservations are required. $30 nonmembers/$25 members. Register online at http://www.shofuso.com/?page_id=15

Omotesenke Tea Ceremony

October 10, 1pm- 4pm

Experience a traditional Japanese tea ceremony conducted by Omotesenke Eastern Region Chapter (Domonkai). Tea ceremony is conducted in three seatings at 1 pm, 2 pm and 3pm. Space is limited and reservations are required. $30 nonmembers/$25 members. Register online at http://www.shofuso.com/?page_id=15   This year, a formal thick tea (koicha) will conducted at the tea house at 2pm- only 10 guests may attend. $40 nonmembers/$35 members. Register online at http://www.shofuso.com/?page_id=15

Shichi Go San (kimono dressing)

October 16 & 17, 2010, by appointment

Celebrate 7-5-3 at Shofuso. Have your child's photograph taken in kimono at the Japanese House and Garden. Children receive traditional sweet bag of Chitose-ame (thousand year candy). Professional photography appointment is 20 minutes. $50 per photography session (maximum of 2 children per session). Kimono rental is $30 per child. Assistance dressing child in his/her own kimono is $15 per child. Appointments are limited and reservations are required. Register online at http://www.shofuso.com/?page_id=15

Fall Clean-Up Day

October 30, 10am-1pm

Join volunteers, members and staff to clean the house and garden in preparation for closing for the season. Enjoy a delicious hot Japanese lunch prepared by volunteers. Space is limited and reservations are required. No fee.  Email info@shofuso.com to register.

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Through September and October, Bryn Mawr College will
sponsor several events highlighting the classical arts of
Cambodia

KHMER ARTS ENSEMBLE
Friday, October 22nd 8PM, Goodhart
For one night only, 30 musicians and dancers from Cambodia’s
Khmer Arts Ensemble take center stage at Bryn Mawr College’s
Goodhart Hall as part of their World Premiere tour of The Lives of
Giants. Drawing on the Cambodian Reamker (Ramayana), The
Lives of Giants fuses classical and experimental dance techniques
into a spare, complex, powerfully spiritual evening that delivers a
resonant message about the effects of violence.
“akin to watching moonlight play across water” L A Times
Free for Tri-College students, faculty, and staff. For public ticket
pricing and information go to www.brynmawr.edu/arts.

MASTER CLASSES IN CLASSICAL CAMBODIAN TECHNIQUE with KHMER ARTS ENSEMBLE
Wednesday, October 20, 4:30-6:00 ~ Swarthmore College, PAC dance studio
Thursday, October 21, 4-5:30 ~ Bryn Mawr College, Pem Dance studio
Saturday, October 23, 10:30 ~ Cambodian Association North Center dance studio 5412 North 5th Street (appropriate for younger students)
Saturday, October 23, 1:00 PM~ The Performance Garage, 1515
Brandywine, Philadelphia (appropriate for dancers with more
extensive training in Cambodian or other techniques)-

LEARNING TO LISTEN. . . with KHMER ARTS ENSEMBLE
Cambodian Music Demonstration / Discussion
Saturday, October 23rd, 7 PM
Goodhart Free Admission. Reservations
required (Office for the Arts 610-526-5210)
Teaching artist, Ros Sokun

and more at Bryn Mawr College. . .

Join us as we celebrate the talent and work of our local Cambodian Artists. These events are free.

Discovering Cambodian Dance Sunday, September 26, 7:00PM,
Hepburn Teaching Theatre, Goodhart
Reception follows featuring Cambodian foods
Classical Cambodian Dances Directed and performed by: Chamroeun Yin and dancers Chamroeun Yin first came to the United States as an artistic refugee in 1981. After he escaped to a refugee camp and met a group of dancers from the Royal Ballet Yin was able to study his
craft in earnest. He continues to teach and perform classical dance in Philadelphia. In addition to his work in dance, his intricate embroidery, jewelry and costume work has been exhibited at the Fleisher Art Memorial and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Masks and Costumes of Classical Khmer Dance
September 28th, 6:30 PM, Goodhart Music Room
Artist and dancer, Chamroeun Yin, will display and discuss the splendid and elegant costumes and masks associated with Cambodian dance. He will discuss how he constructs the costumes and masks and answer questions. Some of the masks and costumes will remain on display in Canaday Library through the month of October. Light refreshments will be served.

Dancing through Death: The monkey, magic, and madness of Cambodia
Film showing and discussion with Thavro Phim –October 4th, 4:00 PM, Carpenter 21
This hour long film documents the story of Thavro Phim, who came of age under the Pol Pot regime and lost many of his
close family members to the genocide inflicted by the Khmer Rouge. During this horrific period, nearly 90 percent of the
dancers were executed or died of starvation or disease. His Buddhist faith and his dedication to the study, performance, and
teaching of Cambodian classical dance, particularly his representation of Hanuman, the magical white monkey, are key in
surviving and finding his identity. The film includes footage of dance as it struggled to survive in the prisons, the refugee
camps and as it emerged after the downfall of the Khmer Rouge. In the film, we also learn about Yale’s Cambodian
Genocide Project and see Thavro return to Cambodia to find his remaining family and teachers.

The Cambodian Monkey Dance: Trickster, warrior, king with Thavro Phim
-October 18, 7:00 PM Pem Studio -Reserve a space (Office for the Arts 610-526-5210)
This workshop will introduce participants to the story and movement of the Monkey–a king, a warrior, a trickster, and an
adventurer. It is open to dancers, as well as to those with experience in other movement forms ranging from tai chi and
capoeira to theatrical improvisation.
Thavro Phim is an expert linguist, artist, author, editor, and translator. A survivor of the genocide who was educated in classical dance at the University of Fine Arts in Phnom
Penh, he excels in the male style. Mr. Phim has taught, performed, and been honored for his work throughout the US. He continues to teach and work in Philadelphia and works
within the Public School system as well. Mr Phim was a research associate for the Yale Cambodian Genocide Program.

“Giant Steps” date/time/place TBA
What do a Classical Cambodian Dance school and a Cambodian hip-hop group have in common? This film highlights two
troupes in Cambodia, the classical Khmer Arts Ensemble and contemporary Hip-hop dancers, who use the power of dance
to help provide hope and courage to young Cambodians. This event features screening of the film and performances by
local Cambodian classical dance students and local Cambodian hip-hop dancers.

__________

Family Sundays: Buddhist Devotional Dioramas

Oct 10, 1-4PM
Penn Museum - Philadelphia

Be inspired by Penn Museum's collection of Buddhist artifacts. Touch
a mini-Buddhist altar from Japan and learn about the objects within it. Then, create your own Buddhist devotional diorama.
Admission: Free with Penn
Museum admission donation.

__________

Friday, October 22 at 8pm

Film with Live Score by Ensemble N_JP

A Page of Madness – World Premiere

dir. Teinosuke Kinugasa, Japan, 1926, 35mm, 85 mins, b/w, silent with live score

Ensemble N_JP (Japan/US) - Akikazu Nakamura, shakuhachi; Gene Coleman, bass clarinet; Toshiko Kuto, koto; Alex Waterman, cello; Evan Lipson, contra bass; Stephanie Griffin, viola and Rei Hotoda, assistant conductor of the Dallas Symphony, conductor

Co-p resented by the Philadelphia Film Society as part of the 2010 Philadelphia Film Festival and supported by the Japan Foundation through the Performing Arts JAPAN program and

A Page of Madness is a collaborative work of Philadelphia composer Gene Coleman and Japanese artist Akikazu Nakamura , commissioned by IHP for the Movement program.  The two created a new musical composition for the 1926 Japanese silent film A Page of Madness . This performance reimagins of the role of contemporary music in the interpretation and presentation of historic films. Following Friday's premiere performance, A Page of Madness screens at the Museum of Modern Art (NYC) in the Eighth MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation.

Free admission members above Adventurer level; $15 Internationalists + Adventurers; $17.50 students + seniors; $20 general admission.  In advance at TICKETWEB or two hours before showtime at The Ibrahim Theater Box Office.

__________

Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia

US-Japan 150 th Anniversary Events

In 1860, the Tokugawa Shogunate sent the first Japanese diplomatic mission to the United States to formally ratify the trade agreement between the two countries. The group of about 80 samurai arrived in San Francisco on March 29 before being enthusiastically welcomed in Washington , D.C. , Baltimore , New York , and Philadelphia . It was a great spectacle at the time and sowed the seeds of the rapid Japanese industrialization of the late 19 th century. The Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia and its partner organizations present a series of events commemorating this historic exchange.

For more information on the following events, please visit: jasgp.org

Picturing the West: Yokohama Prints 1859-1870s
August 28 - November 14
Philadelphia Museum of Art

Kirie Exhibititon
Exhibit: November 1 through December 3
Pearlstein Gallery, Nesbitt Hall, Drexel University

Kimono Dressing Course
Wednesday, September 22 - This installment will introduce the history and traditions of kimono culture teaching you the pieces and how to wear the “shitagi” or under layer.

Wednesday, September 29 - This installment will add the outer layer of the kimono.

Wednesday, October 6 - The final installment will teach you how to tie an obi and help you perfect the process.

Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce
200 S. Broad Street , 7 th Floor, Philadelphia , PA 19102

US-Japan Business Luncheon The second annual luncheon will feature keynote speaker, Shuhei Aoki, General Manager for the Americas , Bank of Japan. Mr. Aoki will discuss Japan 's financial reforms and discuss the impact on its future in global market as well as its relationship with US and China . JASGP member : $60/ non-member: $70

Register on-line : jasgp.org
Thursday, October 28, 11:30 AM
Union League of Philadelphia
140 South Broad Street , Philadelphia , PA 19102

__________

Kobe : Japan 's Window on the World

Celebration of the 25 th Anniversary of Friendship City between Kobe and Philadelphia

DATES: March 26, 2011 September 2011 (Sept. 18, 2011)

PLACE: Japanese galleries 241, 242 and 243

LOANS: Newark Museum

Independence Seaport Museum , Philadelphia

Private Collection

DESCRIPTION:

2011 marks the 25 th anniversary of the “Friendship Cities Relationship” between Kobe and Philadelphia . In honor of this important relationship, art works related to Kobe dating from the Muromachi through Meiji periods will be exhibited in the Japanese galleries. The exhibition will focus on Kobe 's history as one of the oldest and most important seaports in Japan , and its role in nurturing cross-cultural influences in Japanese art.

In Medieval times, Kobe was the main port for China trade, importing Chinese ceramics and paintings. During the Edo period, Kobe became the key port for domestic shipping under direct Tokugawa governmental control and also served as a base for Korean diplomatic missions. After Commodore Perry's arrival in 1953, Kobe became known worldwide as a modern and international city.



(III) Employment and Internship Opportunities

New AsiaLearn Internships in Shanghai

All internship program options in Shanghai will include: 12 hours of private and personalized Mandarin language lessons each month; Housing in shared apartment or single studio; 24/7 support staff at our overseas office in Shanghai; Counseling and placement into an English speaking internship; Pre-departure assistance, including visa and flight assistance; and Monthly professional and social events. We will offer two different internship structures to fit any applicant's schedule:

Professional Development for Academic Credit (PDAC) - www.asialearn.org/PDAC The PDAC program is a 10-week internship with pre-set dates. For 2011, the program dates are June 1 - August 12 and September 13 - November 25. We are currently accepting applications for all programs and deadlines will be 3-4 months before the program start date. The PDAC program includes 6 academic credit from Chapman University, as well as AsiaLearn's Bridging Cultures Program.

Custom Date Internship Program - www.asialearn.org/CustomDate
The Custom Date program is ideal for any applicant who has a schedule conflict with the above PDAC dates. Applicants can choose their own start and end dates for any program length of 8, 12, or 16 weeks. No academic credit is included in the program, but applicants can pursue credit through their home university. An in-country orientation is also included.



(IV) Fellowship and Award Opportunities

Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) Program, deadline Monday , November 15

The United States Department of State is pleased to announce the scholarship competition for the 2011 Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) Program for overseas intensive summer language institutes in thirteen critical need foreign languages. CLS institutes provide fully-funded group-based intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences for seven to ten weeks for U.S. citizen undergraduate and graduate students.

Levels available for each language are as follows:

· Arabic: Advanced beginning, intermediate or advanced level

· Bangla/Bengali, Hindi, Indonesian, Korean, Punjabi, Turkish, or Urdu: Beginning, intermediate or advanced level

· Azerbaijani, Chinese, Japanese, Persian, or Russian: Intermediate or advanced level

The CLS Program is part of a U.S. government effort to expand dramatically the number of Americans studying and mastering critical need foreign languages. Students of diverse disciplines and majors are encouraged to apply. For further information, including application materials, please visit: http://clscholarship.org/

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The Boren Awards provide funding to U.S. undergraduate and graduate students who are pursuing international and language study in world regions critical to U.S. interests, such as Africa, Asia, Central and Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Boren Scholarships for undergraduate students provide up to $20,000 for study abroad, while the Boren Fellowship for graduate students can provide up to $30,000 for language study and international research. In return for funding, recipients commit to working for the federal government for at least one year after the completion of their education. For more information about the Boren Awards, please visit http://www.borenawards.org/ The Boren Awards will also be offering a series of webinars this fall for potential applicants and interested faculty/staff. Please share this schedule and encourage your students to participate. To see a description of the webinars, please click on a registration link or visit http://www.borenawards.org/webinars.html

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Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature
The Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture at Columbia University annually awards $6,000 in Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission Prizes for the Translation of Japanese Literature. A prize is given for the best translation of a modern work or a classical work, or the prize is divided between equally distinguished translations.

The 2011 Translation Prize applications are due by Thursday, October 28, 2010.

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Franklin R. Buchanan Prize Call For Submissions The Association for Asian Studies (AAS) invites submissions for the Franklin R. Buchanan Prize. Established in 1995 by the AAS Committee on Educational Issues and Policy and the Committee on Teaching about Asia, the prize is awarded annually to recognize an outstanding curriculum publication on Asia designed for any educational level, elementary through university. The winning submission will reflect current scholarship, present innovative teaching strategies, and make a significant impact on the intended audience. Submissions must have been published after January 1, 2009, and include extensive teaching strategies in order to be considered. Various formats are acceptable, including print, CD, video, and online formats. Submissions that address underrepresented regions of Asia are encouraged. The 2010 Buchanan prize will be awarded to the author of the work at the AAS Annual Meeting in Honolulu, March 31-April 3, 2011. The prize includes a $1,000 monetary award and a one year membership to AAS. Submissions are due November 1, 2010. For more information and a submission form, please contact the Chair of the Committee: Kevin Lawrence Phone: (212) 744-8181, x129 E-mail: klawrence@chinainstitute.org To view past awards, visit the AAS Web site: http://www.asian-studies.org/publications/book-prizes.htm.
http://www.keenecenter.org/content/view/58/76/



(V) East Asia Study Opportunities and Queries

*Education About Asia <edast@utc.edu>

Call for Manuscripts: US, Asia, and the World, 1620-1914. EAA Fall 2011 Education About Asia (EAA) is the peer-reviewed teaching journal of the Association for Asian Studies. Our readers include undergraduate instructors as well as high school and middle school teachers. Our articles are intended to provide educators, who are often not specialists, with basic understanding of Asia-related content. Qualified referees evaluate all manuscripts submitted for consideration. A plurality of our readers teaches some form of world history, but some of our secondary school teachers are also responsible for US History. We are in the process of developing a special section entitled "US, Asia, and the World, 1620-1914" for the fall 2011 issue of EAA. In this special section, we invite authors to submit manuscripts that encompass a wide range of US-Asia topics that focus upon interactions and significant events, drawing from a wide range of areas of study including the arts, diplomacy and politics, economics, military history, and society and culture. We are looking for manuscripts concerning all areas of Asia. We seek manuscripts both from historians of Asia and scholars and teachers with expertise on the US and other parts of the world. We are especially interested in manuscripts where authors address US-Asia interactions that proved to have global impact. Prospective authors should be aware that over fifty percent of our readers are secondary or middle school teachers and the rest teach at the undergraduate level. We are most interested in manuscripts that are useful for introductory survey-level courses at both the secondary and undergraduate levels. Please consult the EAA guidelines, available on the Web site under my signature, before submitting a manuscript for this special section. Pay particular attention to feature and teaching resources manuscript word-count ranges. Prospective authors are also encouraged to share possible manuscript ideas with me via email. The deadline for initial submission of manuscripts is May 10, 2011.

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New AsiaLearn Internships in Shanghai

All internship program options in Shanghai will include: 12 hours of private and personalized Mandarin language lessons each month; Housing in shared apartment or single studio; 24/7 support staff at our overseas office in Shanghai; Counseling and placement into an English speaking internship; Pre-departure assistance, including visa and flight assistance; and Monthly professional and social events. We will offer two different internship structures to fit any applicant's schedule:

Professional Development for Academic Credit (PDAC) - www.asialearn.org/PDAC The PDAC program is a 10-week internship with pre-set dates. For 2011, the program dates are June 1 - August 12 and September 13 - November 25. We are currently accepting applications for all programs and deadlines will be 3-4 months before the program start date. The PDAC program includes 6 academic credit from Chapman University, as well as AsiaLearn's Bridging Cultures Program.

Custom Date Internship Program - www.asialearn.org/CustomDate
The Custom Date program is ideal for any applicant who has a schedule conflict with the above PDAC dates. Applicants can choose their own start and end dates for any program length of 8, 12, or 16 weeks. No academic credit is included in the program, but applicants can pursue credit through their home university. An in-country orientation is also included.



(VI) Conferences and Workshops

Conference on Buddhism, Daoism, and Chinese Religion, Oct. 8-10, 2010, Princeton University.

An international conference on the study of Buddhism, Daoism (Taoism), and Chinese religion. Over twenty scholars from Asia, Europe, and the U.S. will gather at Princeton University to reflect on Chinese religion, using the interactions between two of China's oldest forms of organized religion, Buddhism and Daoism, as a starting point. Sessions, all held in Jones Hall Room 202, begin on Friday, October 8, at 4:30 pm, continue through October 9, and conclude on the morning of October 10. The conference is free and open to the public, but pre-registration is required (please contact bbermel@princeton.edu ). At the conference pre-distributed papers will be discussed in English and Chinese.

The conference is sponsored by Princeton's Program in East Asian Studies (The Mercer Trust), Council in the Humanities (David P. Gardner Magic Project), Center for the Study of Religion, Buddhist Studies Workshop, and the École française d'Extrême-Orient.

For schedule, abstracts of papers, and to register for the conference, see the conference website at http://www.princeton.edu/csr/current-research/buddhist/buddhism-daoism-and-chine/ .
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PERSPECTIVES ON THE LIAO
An International Conference Sponsored by Bard Graduate Center and The Council on East Asian Studies at Yale University

Thursday - Friday, September 30-October 1 , 2010 the conference will be held at Yale University , Henry R. Luce Hall Auditorium, 34 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven
Saturday, October 2, 2010 the conference will be held at Bard Graduate Center , 38 West 86th Street, New York

Archaeological discoveries of the past thirty years have transformed the study of the Liao Dynasty (907–1125) into a vibrant field of inquiry. This conference brings together scholars from Australia, China, Germany, Israel, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the U.S. to present new findings about the Liao elite, their Kitan language and script, Buddhist patronage, funerary culture, and international relations.

Those wishing to attend should contact valerie.hansen@yale.edu    in advance

Thursday (September 30), Yale

1:30 p.m.-4:00 Digital Poster Session

5:00 p.m. Keynote

Tala (Director, Inner Mongolia Museum, Huhhot)

6:30 Reception (including dinner) for all those attending

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Friday (October 1), Yale

8:30 Breakfast

9:00-12:00 Panel 1: Understanding the Kitan Language

Daniel Kane (Macquarie University, Sydney), Chair. “The Name of the Kitan State in Kitan”

Andrew Shimunek (Indiana University, Bloomington), “Kitan and its Genetic Affiliation to Mongolic: Evidence of a Mongol-Xianbeic Family”

Wayne Wei-yu Tan (Harvard University, Cambridge), “Fill in the Blanks - Sources and Methods in Kitan Script Decipherment”   Chia Ning (Central College, Pella, Iowa), “The Seal Culture ( ??? , yinwenhua ) in the Liao Dynasty”  

break 10:50-11:10

11:10­-12:00 Panel 2: Kitan Nomads and Sedentary Culture

Nicola di Cosmo (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton), chair

Naomi Standen (University of Newcastle, U.K) and Gwen Bennett (McGill University, Montreal), “Tearing Down the Great Wall: The Evidence from Post-Han Blackwares”   Lin Hu (Qinghua University, Beijing), “Rethinking the Liao Cities: Archaeological and Textual Perspectives”  

12:00-1:00 lunch

1:00-2:30 Panel 3: Kitan Elite Society

Nicola diCosmo, chair

Linda Cooke Johnson (Michigan State University, East Lansing, emerita), “Kitan Women in Liao Society”

Pamela Crossley (Dartmouth College), “Outside In: Power, Identity, and the Han Lineage of Jizhou”

Lothar Ledderose (University of Heidelberg, emeritus), “Celebrating Renewal: The Stele of 965/1005 AD at Cloud Dwelling Monastery”

break 2:30-3:00

3:00-4:30 Panel 4: Buddhist Patronage

Chair : Robert Gimello (University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN)

Solonin Kirill (Saint-Petersburg State University), on Monk Tongli and Xi-Xia-Liao Buddhism (title to come)  

Hsueh-man Shen (Institute of Fine Arts, New York), “ One Thing Contains All, and All Things Contain One: Huayan Buddhism and the Liao Pagodas”

Robert Gimello (University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN), “Studies of Liao Buddhism”

4:30 pm Bus for conference participants departs for New York City

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Saturday, BGC

9:00 Keynote

Wu Hung (University of Chicago)

break 10:15-10:30

10:30-12:45 Panel 4: Burials and Buildings

Dieter Kuhn (University of Würzburg, emeritus), Panel chair

Dong Xinlin (CASS), “Excavating Zuling”

François Louis (Bard Graduate Center), “Iconic Ancestors: Reassessing Kitan Elite Burials”

Xin Chen (University of Oxford), “The House for Deities and the House for the Dead: Miniature Buildings in the Liao Period”

Nancy Steinhardt (University of Pennsylvania), “ Eminent and Not-Quite-Such Eminent Liao Architecture”

Chair's comments, discussion

12:45-2:00 lunch (at BGC)

2:00-5:15 Panel 5: Liao Beyond China

Mimi Yiengpruksawan (Yale University), chair, intro paper on Liao “Ecumene”

Youn-mi Kim (Harvard University), “Shingon Ritual and the Chaoyang Pagoda Relics”

Brian Vivier (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), “Liao Integration in the Religious Networks of Eleventh-Century Northeast Asia”

3:15Youngsook Pak (SOAS, London, emerita), “ Exchanges or Borrowings? Some Observations on Koryo and Liao Buddhist Images”

break 3:50-4:10

Michal Biran (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem), “The Liao and the Muslim World: Political, Economic and Cultural Contacts”

Valerie Hansen (Yale), “Evidence for International Trade”

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Conclusions

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5:30 Reception (at BGC)

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The Columbia Center for Japanese Religion presents
the 2010 John C. Weber Symposium on Japanese Religion and Culture:

Images and Objects in Japanese Buddhist Practice

Thursday, October 7 th
6:00 - 6:30pm Reception
6:30 - 8:00pm Mimi Yiengpruksawan, Yale University
Fire Starter: The Local and Global Implications of Fujiwara no Yukinari’s Devotion to Blue Acala

Friday, October 8th
9:30 - 10:25am Helmut Brinker, University of Zurich
The Iconic Body as Insight into Japanese Buddhist Practice
10:50 - 11:45am Nedachi Kensuke, Kyoto University
Materiality and Meaning: Sacred Trees and the Construction of Buddhist Images
1:00 - 1:55pm Cynthea Bogel, University of Washington
Representation, Visual Efficacy, and the Impact of Mikky
2:30 - 3:25pm Nagaoka Ryusaku, Tohoku University
Landscape and Buddha Image: Place and Symbolic Function in Buddhist Practice
4:00 - 4:55pm Sherry Fowler, University of Kansas
Finding the Feminine in the Thirty-Three Kannon
SATUR day, October 9th
9:30 - 10:25am Samuel Morse, Amherst College
Securing a Place: Chindangu in Early Japan
10:50 - 11:45am Yui Suzuki, University of Maryland
Possessions: Spirits, Objects, and Bodies in Heian Birthing Rituals
1:00 - 1:55pm Yonekura Michio, Sophia University
Format and Function: On Hanging Scrolls Depicting
the Lives of Eminent Monks
2:30 - 3:25pm Bernard Faure, Columbia University
The Benzaiten and Dakiniten Mandalas: A Problem or an Enigma?
4:00 - 4:55pm Abe Yasuro, Nagoya University
Performing the Prince: Sh toku Taishi in Medieval
Religious Text, Image, and Ritual Space

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VISUALIZING ASIA IN THE MODERN WORLD:
A CONFERENCE ON IMAGE-DRIVEN SCHOLARSHIP
Harvard University
May 20 & 21, 2011

Jointly sponsored by the Visualizing Cultures project at M.I.T. and the following programs at Harvard: Asia Center, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Korea Institute, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies. 

This two-day conference will consist of image-driven presentations addressing both Asian and non-Asian representations of 19th and 20th-century developments in the history of East and Southeast Asia.
The conference will be open to the public. Contributors will be provided lodging, but should be prepared to cover their travel expenses. "Visualizing Asia in the Modern World" follows a lively conference on this same subject held at Yale in the spring of 2010, and we again look forward to international participation in opening these new windows of perception and understanding.

The presentations themselves will be relatively brief, no more than 20 minutes in length. Proposals for presentations, up to 3 pages double spaced, plus a small number of representative images, should be submitted by
December 1, 2010 to Scott Shunk, Program Director of Visualizing Cultures at <shunk@mit.edu>.

For a suggestive sense of possible topical and thematic approaches, including innovative formatting of online scholarship and pedagogy, see visualizingcultures.mit.edu as well as the list of presentations made at the Yale conference http://www.visualizingasia.com .  Priority will be given to those who did not present at the previous conference.



Center for East Asian Studies
University of Pennsylvania
642 Williams Hall
255 S. 36th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305
Tel: 215-573-4203; Fax: 215-573-2561
E-mail: ceas@ccat.sas.upenn.edu